A Simple, Effective Noise Reduction Technique for Night Sky Photos

As a photographer I always get asked for advice on buying cameras and what is the least amount needs to be spent to achieve professional results. It usually happens when I’m photographing a wedding, which also means I rarely have time to properly address the question.

When photographer Steve Arklay discovered his photo on someone else’s Instagram account, posted without credit or permission, he didn’t send a takedown request. Instead, he started a dialogue with the photo thief, trying to buy a print of his own photograph.

Once this was the most glorious building of Romania but since 1990 it’s been abandoned and slowly but surely falling apart. The building is now listed as a historic monument by the Ministry of Culture and Religious Affairs of Romania.

Noise reduction for night sky photos can be tricky, because the algorithms at play often reduce the sharpness of your stars while removing noise in the darkest parts of the sky. In this video tutorial, photographer Dave Morrow shows you how to avoid this issue altogether using a simple, effective editing technique.

Camera technology has come a long way in the last two decades; heck, it’s come a long way in the last 5 years. But sometimes even decades old tech can keep up, like the Nikon F3H SLR and its burst mode that maxed out at a blazing fast 13fps in 1996!

Want to see what kind of work goes into turning a masterful photograph into an iconic print? Pablo Inirio, the master darkroom printer who works at Magnum Photos’ New York headquarters, has personally worked on some of the cooperative’s best-known images. A number of his marked-up darkroom prints have appeared online, revealing the enormous amount of attention Inirio gives photos in the darkroom.

If you love light painting, then have I got a toy for you. The Pixelstick from Bitbanger Labs, which may just be one of the coolest ways to express your creative side after the sun sets.

Canadian photographer François Brunelle is fascinated with the human face and the question of whether everyone has a doppelganger somewhere on Earth that looks exactly like them. For years now, he has been working on a project called I’m Not a Look-Alike!, which features portraits of people who look like identical twins but aren’t actually related at all. Brunelle looks for subjects whose faces are so similar that their close friends might have trouble telling them apart.

Edelkrone’s tag line is simply “reinvent,” and that’s exactly what the company is doing with their new StandPLUS: they’re reinventing the tripod. Or rather, they’re throwing the tripod out altogether in favor of a different sort of camera holder.

Apple’s iPhone 7 has long been rumored to sport dual cameras, but the smartphone might have another interesting photographic trick up its sleeve when it arrives: optical zoom. A new patent from Apple shows how they could make this happen without making the phone bulkier.

Be honest: you’d do it too if you could. Artist Jasper St Aubyn West, better known as Tail Jar, recently embarked on a sketch challenge, transforming his “same old photos” of the “same old places” into something special… by adding monsters!

When Fujifilm offered to pay photographer Zack Arias to create a promotional video about their products, Arias didn’t simply create a typical behind the scenes or gear review video. He turned the opportunity into a trip to Morocco, to help out a worthy cause.

News broke back in February that Russian camera manufacturer Zenit was going to come back and take on Leica in the luxury camera market. But the first Zenit products to see the light of day aren’t cameras, it’s three very fast KMZ/Zenit lenses: the Zenitar 50mm f/0.95, 50mm f/1.2, and 85mm f/1.2.

In this article I will describe how to construct a simple reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) setup using an Arduino microprocessor and a 3D printer.

Renowned travel photographer Bob Holmes says he shoots in a “National Geographic style.” A style that he describes as not about the photographer, but about the subject; a style that is graphic, and features a strong use of color. And in this video, he shares some tips that will help you capture some of that iconic style in your photos as well.

Loss and desperation, love and respect, bravery and triumph, these are the themes that COOPH is exploring in their newest video, and they’re doing it by reviewing some of the most powerful photographs ever captured.

There’s nothing like a spot of macro photography for making you stop to appreciate nature’s tinier gems.

Watching the aurora borealis dance above your head is a transformative human experience that thousands capture from places like Norway and the Canadian Rockies every year. But watching it dance beneath your feet? That’s an experience only a fortunate few will ever get to have.

This Nikon D750 Review by Ross Harvey was originally published on his blog, and is being reprinted in full with permission.



What this review isn’t: pixel peeping and statistical comparisons between various cameras.

What this review is: a real world account in a professional environment from a gear lover with high standards. It’s not intended to be a catch-all review, it’s specifically tailored for my own needs and shooting style.

Important notes: 1) These cameras were paid for by myself, it’s an unbiased review. 2) I have used and compared gear from many other brands. They didn’t hit the spot and hence not adopted professionally. 3) Every shot (except dance floor) is ambient/available light. No flash whatsoever.

Artist and photographer Fabian Oefner is constantly working out new and interesting ways to create his art—whether it’s splattering paint using a spinning drill bit or ‘disintegrating’ a car piece by piece. For his latest series ‘Corona,’ he turned his attention to petrol and achieved unexpectedly beautiful results.

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