When a Camera’s Frame Rate is Synced to a Helicopter’s Rotor…

YouTuber Chris Chris captured the above video showing what happens when your camera’s frame rate is perfectly synced to the rotation speed of a helicopter’s rotor: the blades are frozen at the same angles in each frame, making it look like the helicopter is magically floating around with frozen rotor blades.

40 years ago, Bob Khoury and Warren Steinberg started selling used photo equipment out of a showcase in an Atlanta, Georgia, flea market. Soon they moved to a brick and mortar store which, to incorporate their earlier experience, they called Showcase. The store grew to be the largest in Atlanta and sold photo and video equipment to amateurs and professionals alike and last year they celebrated their 40th anniversary.

Here’s an interesting photography first that is set to happen in 2017: scientists are planning to capture the first ever photo of a black hole’s event horizon (the boundary of no return that light can’t event escape).

Things aren’t looking good for the standalone point-and-shoot camera. As smartphone cameras continue to improve, compact camera sales continue to nosedive. A new historical sales chart with 2016 figures shows just how quickly point-and-shoots are dying off.

It’s understandable that the great unwashed masses of the larger population might not appreciate contemporary art. But you’d think that photographers, who are creatives in their own right, would appreciate the art and creativity of others in all of its various forms. What I’ve seen instead is that, when it comes to much contemporary art, most (but not all!) photographers tend to dismiss the work outright.

Lightning is an amazing subject to try and photograph. Dazzling. Unpredictable. Fulfilling. I’ve been documenting the long arm of Zeus for more than two decades and still love it. First using transparencies and negatives, then digital. There are many ways to be creative when it comes to photographing lightning.

The photographer brand COOPH made this 3-minute video in which photographer Lorenz Holder shares the interesting story behind how he shot a photo that won the prestigious photo contest Red Bull Illume 2016.

I recently rediscovered an old photography technique that allows you to add surreal color to photos that show movement in the frame. The technique seems to be new in the digital domain, but the technique itself has been known since the early era of digital photography.

About a year ago, I was asked if I would like to do a wedding photography at night. The bride Erika had seen a photo of a moon halo I took earlier that year. In that photo, I had two friends that I ran into that night. They were out chasing the northern lights and I asked if I could take a photo of them together with the moon halo.

For landscape photographers, getting your entire scene in focus while keeping things as sharp as possible at the same time can be a challenge.
But if you follow the simple technique laid out by photographer Joshua Cripps in the tutorial above, as he puts it, it becomes “as easy as manually removing a corn syrup-based artificially-flavored confectionary product, from the infantile grasp of a newborn Homo sapien.”

Since the introduction of the Fujifilm X-Series line of cameras, reviewers and consumers have struggled to compare them directly to the competition. Fujifilm’s is a tightly integrated system, wherein everything is a little bit different.

I initially refused to believe it when this photo came across my feed. My eyes aren’t broken! I can see they’re strawberries, and they’re definitely red. They have to be trolling us with this image, right?

Lomography is selling a new limited edition film called Color Negative F²/400. It’s a film with an unusual concept and backstory: it was aged like wine in oak casks for 7 years.

I’m a firm believer that photography is a game of inches. So today I’ll share with you what I’ve learned about mastering autofocus shooting in a variety of difficult situations.

In 2015, photographer David Gaberle walked over 2,200 miles (3,600 kilometers) through some of the world’s most metropolitan areas, photographing people in cities such as New York, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Sydney, London and Seoul. He’s now turning this project into a book titled Metropolight.

Last year, journalist Esther Honig published a viral series of images showing how photo retouchers in 27 countries around the world “enhanced” a portrait of her according to their cultural preferences. Inspired by that project, the UK medical website Superdrug Online Doctor just published a similar experiment that explores body image.

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But I wonder, what else do “they” say? In order to find out I’ve culled together the best quotes on the subject of photography. I hope they inspire you.

Here’s an old-ish video that’s been making the rounds again lately (viral videos are like viruses — they don’t go away very easily). Titled “Camera shutter speed synchronized with helicopter blade frequency,” it shows what can happen when your camera is synchronized with the RPM of a helicopter’s rotor blades. The resulting footage makes the helicopter look as though it’s just floating in the air!

Snapchat is known for popularizing the idea of the self-destructing photo, but did you know that long before Snapchat existed, Polaroid had already offered its own line of self-destructing Polaroid pictures? It was called the Fade to Black line.

I recently wrote an article about 8 Reasons You Should Buy A 50mm f/1.8 Lens and one part was about using it with the “El Bokeh Wall.” What’s an El Bokeh Wall? It’s using some aluminum foil to add beautiful bokeh to the background of your photos. Here’s a full tutorial on the technique.

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